Protect Your Mobile Phones and Tablets

SecurityENWith the continuing evolution of technology, mobile phones and tablets are becoming prevalent in their use, taking the place of computers for many people. We want to remind you that it is equally as important to protect your mobile phones and tablets with antivirus and anti-malware apps as it has been to protect your computer.

This need for protection has been brought more into focus lately with a malware that locks devices attacking the users/customers of larger financial institutions. While we believe that community banks like Merchants are low on the priority list of these attacks, we still want you to be prepared.

The good news for iPad and iPhone users is that there isn’t any need for the use of antivirus and anti-malware apps. It has been taken care of in the design of the device.

For Android devices, like non-Apple phones and tablets, there are a number of different of apps that can be used to combat viruses and malware. We’ve listed a number of them in alphabetical order for you and encourage you to research these apps more in depth. You can download all these apps from the “Google play” store:

  • 360 Mobile Security – Free.
  • Antivirus and Mobile Security – Free.
  • Antivirus Mobile Security – There are paid versions available.
  • AntiVirus Security Free by AVG – Free.
  • BitDefender AntiVirus Free – Free.
  • Dr. Web Antivirus – There is a free version and paid version.
  • Hornet AntiVirus Free – Free.
  • Lookout Security & Antivirus – Free.
  • Mobile Security Antivirus FREE – Free.
  • Norton Security Antivirus – There is a free version and paid version.
  • NQ Mobile Security & Antivirus – There is a free version and paid version.
  • Mobile Security and AntiVirus by Avast – There is a free version and paid versions.
  • Mobile Security and Antivirus by ESET – There is a free version and paid version.
  • Zoner AntiVirus Free – There is a free version and paid version.

Cyber Security Tips for Business Owners

CyberSecurityTipsIf you own a business, your list of stressors is probably vast: Sales, employee turnover, competition — so the last thing you want to worry about is your cyber security. Nevertheless, it’s important to establish an official security plan. Why? Cyber fraud (any crime that involves a computer and/or network) is becoming more and more of a frequent issue. In fact, companies with 250 employees or less suffered more than 30 percent of all online attacks last year (up from about 18 percent in 2011), according to Symantec.com’s 2013 Internet Security Threat Report.

“Cyber criminals are business people, too,” said Arild Jensen, owner of Secos Security, a Granada Hills, CA firm that specializes in cyber security for small businesses. “They’re going to go for the easiest, most rewarding target.”

Fear not. Here are five easy ways to make sure your business’s Internet environment is as secure as it can be.

1. Choose strong passwords. Make sure passwords — for e-mail, Wi-Fi, websites and other platforms — are secure. The most important aspect of creating a password: How long it is.

“The length of the password matters more than its absolute complexity,” explains Steve Gibson, president of Gibson Research in CA. They should be eight or more characters. For even more protection, include letters, numbers, punctuation or special symbols, like an exclamation point.

2. Stay up to date — on everything. That means having the latest security software, web browser, operating system, etc., which can help guard against viruses, malware and other online threats. Most of these programs can be set to update automatically. Also important: Whenever you update your antivirus software, make sure to run a scan afterward. Installing or updating your antispyware technology is crucial as well. Spyware — as the title suggests — essentially spies on you, and is able to access personal information from your business without you knowing.

3. Pay attention to Wi-Fi. Rename your office network and change the password often, about every five or six months.

“Almost anyone can go online and find software that will automatically break into [the network],” explains Michael Hicks, director of the University of Maryland — College Park’s Cybersecurity Center. Tip: Avoid making the network title your company’s name.

4. Work with your financial institution. Ask your financial institution about protection programs. They may be able to offer a plan that allows you to monitor any suspicious activity that has occurred, like checking payments that you don’t recognize. This can help you prevent any unauthorized transactions before they occur.

5. Back up your data regularly. Sometimes, even when you do everything right, hacking can still occur. Having backup copies of important business data and information ensures that you’ll never have to start from square one. Store extra files (everything from Word documents and spreadsheets to human resource info and financial files) at a location other than your office. To make it easier, set up your files so they get backed up automatically.

6. Educate your employees.
Making sure workers are up to speed on the safest online tactics means less of a chance of a cyber mishap. Also instill the importance of not posting any confidential business-related information on social media platforms they may have, and that they don’t store business-related information on personal hard drives. Your employee’s passwords should also be different from what they use for personal passwords.

 

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Target Data Breach

Target is investigating a potential data breach that may have affected millions of debit and credit cards nationwide. Initial reports indicate the breach appears to have started around Black Friday, November 28, 2013, and may have extended through the middle of December.

If you used a debit card, credit card or gift card at a Target store between these dates, please be sure to monitor your account activity closely for fraudulent transactions and report any transactions that you did not initiate to the financial institution that issued your card.

We have not yet received notification that any Merchants Bank credit cards or debit cards were involved in the breach, and even though Merchants Bank has fraud monitoring security in place, we strongly encourage Merchants Bank customers to monitor their own Merchants Bank Credit Card and Debit Card activity. For our customers who would prefer the peace of mind of having their current card(s) closed and new ones reissued, please feel free to stop in your local Merchants Bank office.

To monitor Merchants Bank Credit Card activity, please go to www.merchantsbank.com and click on Credit Card Login.

To monitor Merchants Bank Debit Card activity, please go to www.merchantsbank.com and login to your Online Banking account.

To monitor Merchants Bank Visa Gift Card activity, please go to www.ppdmoney.com or call 1-866-208-3282.

If you notice any fraudulent activity on a Merchants Bank credit or debit card, please report it as soon as possible by calling your local Merchants Bank branch or calling toll-free, 1-800-944-6285. Please note, initial reports indicate that the data breach did not affect purchases made online at Target, just in the retail stores.

For tips on protecting your card information, identity, and more, please visit https://www.merchantsbank.com/files/IdentityTheft.pdf

All that Glitters is Not Gold

GoldenStarsEN

There are some businesses that operate on the edge of the truth. You know them. You see them throughout the media, populating the web and video. While what they are saying may have some truth to it, it may not be the whole truth.

These companies will give something of value for your investment (though not nearly to the level of your investment). Because of that, many of these companies are legal and operate legitimately, albeit at the edge of legitimacy.

What we are asking you to do is to be skeptical of the claims these companies make. Use your common sense. The old adage remains true: if it seems too good to be true, it probably is.

For instance, there’s a company that sells “historical bonds,” claiming they have exceptional value. They do have value as collector’s items, but nothing more. The bonds were paid off in the 1800s after a bankruptcy. Another company claims that being a member can help you stop a mortgage foreclosure and your loan can be paid in full. You do receive some value for your “membership,” but the company often falls short of its claims.

There are several resources that can help you stay on guard against potential scams, such as the U.S. Treasury Fraud Alerts page, or our Merchants Bank security page, or our Alerts page. Protect yourself and your family by taking the time to understand what is being offered and your true costs.

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